Unpicking just one tiny part of interim teacher assessment

We’ve been waiting, but not, I may say, with bated breath. There was no doubt in my mind that the descriptors would be less useful for measuring attainment than a freshly-caught eel. Let’s just look at Reading for KS2 and see how easy it would be to make judgements that would be fair across pupils, classes and schools.

The pupil can:
• read age-appropriate books with confidence and fluency (including whole novels)

  • which books are deemed age-appropriate?
  • define confidence
  • define fluency
  • novels?
  • compare it to the KS1 statement: read words accurately and fluently without overt sounding and blending, e.g. at over
    90 words per minute

• read aloud with intonation that shows understanding

  • intonation does not imply understanding. My best orator from last year, had no understanding of what he was reading so beautifully.

• work out the meaning of words from the context

  • how is this an end of ks2 requirement? This is what we do from the moment we start to read.

• explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, drawing inference and justifying these with evidence

  • again – how do we extract the end of KS2 requirement from this? It could apply to year1 or PhD level.
  • compare the KS1 requirement: make inferences on the basis of what is said and done

• predict what might happen from details stated and implied

  • again – end of KS2 requirement?
  • compare to KS1 working at greater depth: predict what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far

• retrieve information from non-fiction

  • again – end of KS2 requirement? To what extent? What level of non-fiction? What type of information? In what way? If a child can not retrieve information from non-fiction, they are operating at a very much lower level than the end of the key stage.

• summarise main ideas, identifying key details and using quotations for illustration

  • to what extent? Again, this is also a degree level requirement

• evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader

  • to what extent?

• make comparisons within and across books.

  • what comparisons? ‘This book has animals and this book has machines.’
  • KS1 greater depth: make links between the book they are reading and other books they have read

I’ve felt like I’ve been arguing for many years, against the strength of mythological belief in the wonders of teacher assessment. Fortunately, it looks like, at long last, there is some recognition in this report that it can not be used where reliability is an issue, e.g.

Some types of assessment are capable of being used for more than one purpose. However, this may distort the results, such as where an assessment is used to monitor pupil performance, but is also used as evidence for staff performance management. School leaders should be careful to ensure that the primary purpose of assessment is not distorted by using it for multiple purposes. (p 24)

and the attempt to create assessment statements from the national curriculum objectives is just one clear reason why that is true. Mike Tidd suggests that we are heading towards the demise of statutory teacher assessment used in this way. Good, because it’s been a nightmare we should be happy to wake from!

Advertisement

Another pointless consultation

The DfE are apparently ‘seeking views on draft performance descriptors for determining pupil attainment at the end of key stages 1 and 2’.

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/performance-descriptors-key-stages-1-and-2

They have previously ‘sought views’ on the draft national curriculum and the assessment policy, which they acknowledged and then proceeded to largely ignore. I should imagine this will be no different. Needless to say, I still responded, as I did with the others, if only for the opportunity to point out how vague and meaningless their descriptors are.

My response in brief:

It is really important that you remove all vague terminology, such as ‘increasing’, or ‘wider’. In removing levels, you acknowledged the unreliability of the system and difficulty faced by teachers in agreeing levels. This document falls into the same trap. It would be far better to provide examples of what was expected at each key stage (and in each year), than these vague descriptions, some of which could apply to any level of study (Reception to post-doctoral). Many teachers have worked for years on helping colleagues to understand exactly what was required to show a pupil’s attainment, and in one fell swoop, the new curriculum has demolished all that work without replacing it with anything effective. Give us a standardised set of concrete examples and explanations (not exemplars of pupils’ work), along the lines of those provided by Kangaroo Maths (when we were grappling with what the levels represented in the old curriculum). Give us some e-assessment software that will allow us to quickly determine and collate this information.

I did want also to say, ‘Give us some mid 20th Century text books, since that’s obviously the source of your ‘new’ curriculum.’ In actual fact this isn’t just a just a bitter jibe. A text book would at least guide us through the current morass. We could really do with some clarity and consistency. I suggest a state of the art information source written by actual experts rather than the range of opportunistic publications which will be cobbled together by commercial companies who are ill-prepared to jump on this latest bandwagon.