Shouldn’t we just say ‘no’?

I’m beginning to wonder why we are playing their game at all. Why are we not questioning the basis for the assumptions about what children should know/be able to do by whatever year, as prescribed in the new curriculum and the soon to be published, rapidly cobbled together, waste of time and paper that are the new ‘descriptors’. Have they based these on any actual research other than what Michael Gove dimly remembered from his own school days?

We recently purchased some published assessments, partly, I’m sorry to say, on my suggestion that we needed something ‘external’ to help us measure progress, now that levels no longer work. It wasn’t what I really wanted – I favour a completely different approach involving sophisticated technology, personal learning and an open curriculum, but that’s another long story and potential PhD thesis! Applying these assessments, though, is beginning to look unethical, to say the least. I’ve always been a bit of a fan of ‘testing’ when it’s purposeful, aids memory and feeds back at the right level, but these tests are utterly demoralising for pupils and staff and I’m pretty sure that’s not a positive force in education. I’m not even sure that I want to be teaching the pupils to jump through those hoops that they’re just missing; I strongly suspect they are not even the right hoops – that there are much more important things to be doing in primary school that are in no way accounted for by the (currently inscrutable) attaining/not attaining/exceeding criteria of the new system.

So what do we do when we’re in the position of being told we have to do something that is basically antagonistic to all our principles? Are we really, after all this time, going to revert to telling pupils that they’re failures? It seems so. Historically, apart from the occasional union bleat, teachers in England have generally tried their best to do what they’re told, as if, like the ‘good’ pupils they might have been when they were at school, they believe and trust in authority. Milgram would have a field day. Fingers on buttons, folks!

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